Cooperative Research Agreements Related to the World Trade Center Health Program (U01)

The summary for the Cooperative Research Agreements Related to the World Trade Center Health Program (U01) grant is detailed below. This summary states who is eligible for the grant, how much grant money will be awarded, current and past deadlines, Catalog of Federal Domestic Assistance (CFDA) numbers, and a sampling of similar government grants. Verify the accuracy of the data FederalGrants.com provides by visiting the webpage noted in the Link to Full Announcement section or by contacting the appropriate person listed as the Grant Announcement Contact. If any section is incomplete, please visit the website for the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, which is the U.S. government agency offering this grant.
Cooperative Research Agreements Related to the World Trade Center Health Program (U01): Background
The World Trade Center Health Program is administered by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH). Information on this program is available at http://www.cdc.gov/niosh/topics/wtc/.
The James Zadroga 9/11 Health and Compensation Act of 2010, Public Law 111-347 (hereafter referred to as “the Zadroga Act”) was signed by President Obama on January 2, 2011, and was re-authorized on December 18, 2015. The Zadroga Act continues monitoring and treatment activities, and requires the establishment (under Subtitle C) of a research program on health conditions resulting from the September 11, 2001, terrorist attacks.

The Zadroga Act lists the following broad research areas:

physical and mental health conditions that may be related to the September 11, 2001, terrorist attacks
diagnosing WTC-related health conditions for which there has been diagnostic uncertainty
treating WTC-related health conditions for which there has been treatment uncertainty

Research mentioned in the Zadroga Act includes epidemiologic and other research studies on WTC-related health conditions or emerging conditions among (1) enrolled WTC responders and certified-eligible WTC survivors under treatment; (2) sampled populations outside the New York City disaster area, in Manhattan (as far north as 14th Street) and in Brooklyn; and (3) control populations, to identify potential for long-term adverse health effects in less exposed populations.
The Zadroga Act specifies establishing a WTC Scientific/Technical Advisory Committee and indicates that the WTC Program Administrator shall consult with the committee in carrying out research activities related to the September 11, 2001, terrorist attacks (http://www.cdc.gov/NIOSH/topics/wtc/stac/).
A growing body of evidence suggests that significant health conditions have emerged that are associated with the disaster, in particular for those exposed during the collapse of the towers and those who participated substantially in rescue, recovery, and clean-up operations.
Information about current and completed NIOSH funded World Trade Center research studies can be found at http://www.cdc.gov/wtc/researchprojects.html. Current citations for articles and publications pertaining to the World Trade Center can be found at http://www.cdc.gov/wtc/wtc.xml. Information on research supported by the World Trade Center Health Registry can be found at: http://www.nyc.gov/html/doh/wtc/html/registry/newsletters.shtml.
Scientific reporting allows health care professionals to make earlier diagnoses of WTC conditions, which leads to more effective treatment. However, scientifically identifying the causes of health problems or conditions is typically very difficult. While it is often not possible to determine the specific cause of an individual's illness or condition, it is critical to promote scientifically rigorous studies and reviews of potential health problems or risk factors among the affected population.
Purpose
To help address the Zadroga Act research mandate, and in consultation with the WTC Scientific/Technical Advisory Committee, NIOSH is soliciting applications for scientifically rigorous research to help answer critical questions about physical and mental health conditions related to the September 2001 terrorist attacks.
Major areas of interest include, but are not limited to, the following:

Linking 9/11 exposure to health conditions

Cancers, multisystem or autoimmune, cardiovascular and neurologic disease (including age at diagnosis)
Characterizing patterns of illness (age, gender, comorbidities, etc.)
Characterizing alterations in health and development for those exposed to 9/11 as children

Characterizing established WTC-related diseases and comorbidities

Identifying phenotypes, biomarkers, epigenetics
Care models that address complex co-morbidities and other modifiable factors

Health services research* and value based care that addresses disaster-related injury and illness for chronic disease
Characterizing the work ability and occupational outcomes for those impacted by 9/11;
Lessons learned in recovery

Identifying and operationalizing key elements of psychological resilience** for disaster responders
Establishing comparison groups for disaster-related research for key health indicators for first responders




*Health services research examines how people get access to health care, how much care costs, and what happens to patients as a result of this care. The main goals of health services research are to identify the most effective ways to organize, manage, finance, and deliver high quality care; reduce medical errors; and improve patient safety. (Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, 2002 )
**Concepts of psychological resilience varies across disciplines with investigations addressing various outcomes ranging from reported levels of stress, burnout, compassion fatigue, and general indicators of well-being. Also proposed are interpersonal, intrapersonal and environmental factors that suggest a more stable and enduring personality trait impacting self-regulation.


Relevant diseases or conditions include, but are not limited to, the following:

Respiratory diseases
Cancer (including detection/diagnosis of pre-malignant changes)
Cardiovascular Disease
Psychological resilience and well-being
Persistent psychiatric conditions such as posttraumatic stress, anxiety and depressive disorders
Cognitive changes
Aging – the impacts of aging on those impacted by 9/11 illness and injury (e.g., premature aging, optimizing adaptation for productivity)
Neurological Diseases
Aerodigestive health
Multisystem or auto-immune diseases
Gastro-esophageal disorders
Gastrointestinal health






The target population for research funded under this FOA are individuals exposed to the September 2001 terrorist attacks, including responders and community members (also referred to as survivors). Responder cohorts or populations include the following:

Local responders (Fire Department of New York [FDNY] and others) who were exposed and (a) still live in the NYC area or (b) have since moved away from the NYC area
Responders who came from outside the NYC area to assist with the response and subsequently returned to their respective home areas

Community members (adults and children) who were exposed to the terrorist attacks include people who (a) still live in the NYC area or (b) have since moved away from the NYC area.
Research Objectives
The overall objective of this announcement is to solicit meritorious and scientifically rigorous research applications that will help

address the Zadroga Act research mandate;
answer critical questions about physical and mental health conditions related to the September 2001 terrorist attacks;
expand knowledge about health and well-being effects related to the September 2001 terrorist attacks;
improve health care services provided by the WTCHP; and
apply lessons learned from 9/11 to improve response to future disasters (see the WTCHP Research-to-Care logic model linked on the program website (http://www.cdc.gov/wtc/researchprojects.html).

Another objective of this announcement is to help address the wide range of research needs related to the WTCHP. NIOSH will do this by considering the following types of U01 cooperative research projects:




Type of Project


Project Period


Total Cost per Year




Long term


Up to five years


Up to $600K




Intermediate-term


Up to three years


Up to $500K




Short-term


Up to two years


Up to $350K




A wide range of research needs can be addressed by each of these types of projects. Applicants must clearly identify which type of project they are proposing and provide sufficient supporting information. In 2016, NIOSH anticipates funding 2 or 3 long-term, 3 or 4 intermediate-term, and 3 or 4 short-term U01 projects.
NIOSH seeks to achieve a suitable mix of projects that help advance treatment effectiveness and the understanding of health and well-being impacts related to the September 2001 terrorist attacks. Increased awareness of effective treatment, interactions between health conditions, patterns of illness and development, exposure-response relationships, and risk factors is critical for achieving improved treatment and intervention protocols.
Resource Sharing Plan
NIOSH considers the sharing of unique data and other research resources developed through the WTCHP an important means to enhance the value and further the advancement of current and future research.
Applicants considering projects that depend on interaction or collaboration with the Data Centers, or the 9/11 Health Registry associated with the World Trade Center Health Program (see listing that follows) must coordinate in advance with the respective Directors or Administrators of the Data Centers in order to ensure access to data and/or availability of adequate numbers of potential participants are feasible to conduct the proposed research. Documentation of the study recruitment plan and agreement on this coordination must be included in the application, along with any budgetary needs for the coordination activities, by providing both a letter from the investigator to the Data Center/Health Registry/WTCHP and a response letter from the Data Center/Health Registry/WTCHP to the investigator.
Data Center and WTC Health Registry Contacts
Fire Department of New York
Director—Dr. David Prezant, 718-999-2696, david.prezant@fdny.nyc.gov
Administrator—Ms. Lara Glass, 718-999-5142 lara.glass@fdny.nyc.gov
Mount Sinai School of Medicine
Director—Dr. Roberto Lucchini, 212-824-7052or 212-241-2131, roberto.lucchini@mssm.edu
Administrator – Jean Weiner, 212-241-2709, jean.weiner@mssm.edu
NYC Health and Hospitals
Director—Ms. Edith Davis, 212-562-4525, Edith.Davis@bellevue.nychhc.org
Administrator—Mr. Larry Chang, 212-788-0949, Lawrence.Chang@nychhc.org
WTC Health Registry
Public Affairs Liaison— Jacquelynn Osoro, 347-396-2919, josoro@health.nyc.gov

See Section VIII, Other Information - Required Federal Citations, for policies related to this announcement.
Federal Grant Title: Cooperative Research Agreements Related to the World Trade Center Health Program (U01)
Federal Agency Name: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
Grant Categories: Health
Type of Opportunity: Discretionary
Funding Opportunity Number: RFA-OH-16-008
Type of Funding: Cooperative Agreement
CFDA Numbers: 319568
CFDA Descriptions: Occupational Safety and Health Program
Current Application Deadline: Apr 19, 2016 Electronically submitted application
Original Application Deadline: Apr 19, 2016 Electronically submitted application
Posted Date: Mar 9, 2016
Creation Date: Mar 9, 2016
Archive Date: May 19, 2016
Total Program Funding: $75,000,000
Maximum Federal Grant Award: $600,000
Minimum Federal Grant Award: $350,000
Expected Number of Awards: 70
Cost Sharing or Matching: No
Applicants Eligible for this Grant
For profit organizations other than small businesses
County governments
Nonprofits that do not have a 501(c)(3) status with the IRS, other than institutions of higher education
Native American tribal governments (Federally recognized)
State governments
Small businesses
Others (see text field entitled "Additional Information on Eligibility" for clarification)
Independent school districts
Native American tribal organizations (other than Federally recognized tribal governments)
City or township governments
Private institutions of higher education
Special district governments
Public housing authorities/Indian housing authorities
Nonprofits having a 501(c)(3) status with the IRS, other than institutions of higher education
Public and State controlled institutions of higher education
Additional Information on Eligibility
Higher Education Institutions

Public/State Controlled Institutions of Higher Education
Private Institutions of Higher Education

The following types of Higher Education Institutions are always encouraged to apply for CDC/NIOSH support as Public or Private Institutions of Higher Education:

Hispanic-serving Institutions
Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs)
Tribally Controlled Colleges and Universities (TCCUs)
Alaska Native and Native Hawaiian Serving Institutions

Nonprofits Other Than Institutions of Higher Education

Nonprofits with 501(c)(3) IRS Status (Other than Institutions of Higher Education)
Nonprofits without 501(c)(3) IRS Status (Other than Institutions of Higher Education)

For-Profit Organizations

Small Businesses
For-Profit Organizations (Other than Small Businesses)

Other

Independent School Districts
Public Housing Authorities/Indian Housing Authorities
Native American Tribal Organizations (other than Federally recognized tribal governments)
Faith-based or Community-based Organizations
Regional Organizations

Foreign Institutions
Non-domestic (non-U.S.) Entities (Foreign Institutions) are not eligible to apply.Non-domestic (non-U.S.) components of U.S. Organizations are not eligible to apply.
Foreign components, as defined in the HHS Grants Policy Statement, are not allowed.
Link to Full Grant Announcement
Grant Announcement Contact
Travis Kubale, Ph.D. TKubale@cdc.gov
Grants Policy

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention 404-498-2015
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