Investigating the effects of mixed-severity wildfires and timber harvest management on interspecific competition and population dynamics of the mesocarnivore guild in northern California and southern Oregon

The summary for the Investigating the effects of mixed-severity wildfires and timber harvest management on interspecific competition and population dynamics of the mesocarnivore guild in northern California and southern Oregon grant is detailed below. This summary states who is eligible for the grant, how much grant money will be awarded, current and past deadlines, Catalog of Federal Domestic Assistance (CFDA) numbers, and a sampling of similar government grants. Verify the accuracy of the data FederalGrants.com provides by visiting the webpage noted in the Link to Full Announcement section or by contacting the appropriate person listed as the Grant Announcement Contact. If any section is incomplete, please visit the website for the Fish and Wildlife Service, which is the U.S. government agency offering this grant.
Investigating the effects of mixed-severity wildfires and timber harvest management on interspecific competition and population dynamics of the mesocarnivore guild in northern California and southern Oregon: Sustainable forest management practices must preserve ecosystem services while also ensuring a productive timber industry. Problems related to maintaining fishers (Pekania pennanti) in healthy ecosystems epitomize the vulnerabilities of forest management practices to conservation efforts, especially related to ecological disturbances. Although not currently listed as threatened or endangered by USFWS, the fisher remains a species of concern in California and in the Pacific states (USDI Fish and Wildlife Service 2016). Previous research has indicated potential short- and long-term tradeoffs between fuels-management activities and fisher persistence (e.g., Scheller et al. 2011, Sweitzer et al. 2016). Investigating the effects of management practices and forest fires on a well-studied population of fishers will allow us to disentangle differences in the effects of one disturbance from another. A better understanding of how fishers respond to habitat changes induced by timber- and fuels-management practices and mixed-severity wildfires is necessary in California, where a future of increased wildfire frequency and intensity is predicted (McKenzie et al. 2004). Our history of monitoring a fisher population in Northern California and Southern Oregon provides sufficient long-term data needed to delineate the effects of timber management and associated ecological disturbances from any naturally occurring variations on the landscape. Additionally, understanding the limits to population growth and to recolonization is imperative for sensitive species that have been extirpated from previously occupied habitats. Once numerous in western forests, the distribution of fisher contracted over the last century due to harvest of fishers for fur and habitat changes associated with logging (Aubry and Houston 1992, Kucera et al. 1995). Current conservation and management practices have yet to see an increase in the population numbers and distribution of fishers in areas previously occupied aside from translocation efforts in California and Washington. One hypothesis for why fisher populations across most of their range in the Pacific Northwest have yet to expand into historically occupied habitats is that interspecific competition from other members of the carnivore guild may limit their presence and abundance. Furthermore, habitat change via natural (e.g., wildfire) and human caused disturbances (e.g., timber harvest and wildfire prevention activities) may affect the relationships within the carnivore guild. Thus, it is important to investigate the effects other members of the carnivore guild have on fishers in regions experiencing varying levels of timber harvest, habitat management, and ecological disturbances.
Federal Grant Title: Investigating the effects of mixed-severity wildfires and timber harvest management on interspecific competition and population dynamics of the mesocarnivore guild in northern California and southern Oregon
Federal Agency Name: Fish and Wildlife Service (DOI-FWS)
Grant Categories: Natural Resources
Type of Opportunity: Discretionary
Funding Opportunity Number: F17AS00130
Type of Funding: Cooperative Agreement
CFDA Numbers: 15.664
CFDA Descriptions: Information not provided
Current Application Deadline: No deadline provided
Original Application Deadline: No deadline provided
Posted Date: March 10th, 2017
Creation Date: March 10th, 2017
Archive Date: March 16th, 2017
Total Program Funding: $150,000
Maximum Federal Grant Award: $150,000
Minimum Federal Grant Award: $150,000
Expected Number of Awards: 1
Cost Sharing or Matching: No
Last Updated: March 10th, 2017
Applicants Eligible for this Grant
Public and State controlled institutions of higher education
Link to Full Grant Announcement
http://www.grant.gov
Grant Announcement Contact
Cooperative Agreements Assistant Misty Bradford 530 841-3110
misty_bradford@fws.gov

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