Development of an early detection of invasive plants monitoring protocol for the Mojave Desert Network Inventory and Monitoring Program

The summary for the Development of an early detection of invasive plants monitoring protocol for the Mojave Desert Network Inventory and Monitoring Program grant is detailed below. This summary states who is eligible for the grant, how much grant money will be awarded, current and past deadlines, Catalog of Federal Domestic Assistance (CFDA) numbers, and a sampling of similar government grants. Verify the accuracy of the data FederalGrants.com provides by visiting the webpage noted in the Link to Full Announcement section or by contacting the appropriate person listed as the Grant Announcement Contact. If any section is incomplete, please visit the website for the National Park Service, which is the U.S. government agency offering this grant.
Development of an early detection of invasive plants monitoring protocol for the Mojave Desert Network Inventory and Monitoring Program: NOTICE OF INTENT TO AWARD
This Funding Announcement is not a request for applications. This announcement is to provide public notice of the National Park Service (NPS), intention to fund the following project activities without competition.

ABSTRACT
Funding Announcement P15AS00263
Project Title Development of an early detection of invasive plants monitoring protocol for the Mojave Desert Network Inventory and Monitoring Program
Recipient University of Montana
Total Anticipated Award Amount $137,994.00
Cost Share none
Anticipated Length of Agreement From date of award to August 31, 2017
Anticipated Period of Performance From date of award to August 31, 2017
Award Instrument Cooperative Agreement
Statutory Authority 54 USC 101702(a) & 54 USC 101702(b)
CFDA # and Title 15.945 Cooperative Research & Training Programs-Resources of NPS CESUs
Single Source Justification Criteria Cited (2) Continuation
Point of Contact June Zastrow 303-987-6718 june_zastrow@nps.gov

OVERVIEW

Early detection monitoring of incipient invasive plants was ranked among the top priorities in the Mojave Desert Network (MOJN) Inventory & Monitoring Program (I&M) in the vital signs selection process due to the clear identification of, and concern about, the effects these plants can have on park ecosystems. The known ecological impacts of invasive species include loss of threatened and endangered species, altered structure and composition of terrestrial and aquatic communities, and reduction in overall species diversity. While long-term changes associated with invasive species are being monitoring through other protocols (i.e., integrated upland vegetation and soils), it is also critical to catch new populations of invasive species early in their invasion of new and sensitive habitats. Only when invasions are caught early will the chance of eradication remain high. Early detection monitoring in the MOJN will include three main components: 1) updating and/or creating individual park early detection species lists; 2) opportunistic surveillance monitoring of invasive plant species that will focus on educating monitoring field crews, cooperators, volunteers, and resource managers on invasive species identification; and 3) development and maintenance of a coherent framework for reporting and disseminating information on potential infestations. These components will allow park resource managers to assess the detection of each invasive species on an individual basis and target limited management resources and coordination toward the highest priority risks.


STATEMENT OF JOINT OBJECTIVES/PROJECT MANAGEMENT PLAN
The product of this project, a monitoring protocol for invasive plants, will benefit not only the MOJN parks, but society at large. Public and private lands bear the burden of disturbance cause directly and indirectly by infestation by non-native species that displace natives and change the ecosystem such that it no longer supports native landscapes and/or species valued by the public. Costs of controlling, removing, and remediating invasive species impacts in the United States are escalating, not only on NPS lands but also on other federal, state, and private lands. The resulting disturbance is often irreparable rendering lands no longer valuable for the visitor's experience. Through this project the NPS will be directly involved with the University of Montana in describing goals, jointly developing the scope, and activities to be accomplished. The NPS will collaborate with the University of Montana to develop a work plan, oversee assignments, distribute tools and provide technical assistance and safety training. This project will engage and educate the University of Montana, partners of public lands throughout the Mojave Desert, communities associated with and visitors to the Mojave Desert Network parks. University of Montana will benefit from the collaborative relationship with NPS because it provides the university an opportunity to provide a service (employ and educate research assistance and students). In addition this project will provide the scientific community and researchers of University of Montana as a whole to gain new knowledge provided through this research.

Development of early detection monitoring of invasive plant species is proposed as a three-phase project. In Phase 1, the University of Montana will work with MOJN I&M to conduct a literature review and report on the current state of invasive species science. In Phase 2, University of Montana will work with MOJN I&M to draft a monitoring protocol and associated standard operating procedures per NPS guidance. In Phase 3, the University of Montana will work with MOJN I&M to field test the standard operating procedures and complete and submit the protocol and SOPs for NPS publication

RECIPIENT INVOLVEMENT

1. Collaboratively undertake a project titled Development of an early detection of invasive plants monitoring protocol for the Mojave Desert Network as described in Attachment I and throughout this document.
2. Hire qualified staff to assist with this project.
3. Develop a work plan for carrying out project objectives.
4. Develop, test, and implement a monitoring protocol that addresses invasive plant monitoring objectives and conforms to I&M standards and guidance.
5. Plan, conduct, and document meetings with the MOJN Invasive Plant protocol working group (i.e. MOJN working group), other cooperators, and other protocol working groups (as needed). Documentation should include participants, discussion topics, outcomes, and decisions.
6. Revise the invasive plants protocol development summary as needed.
7. Follow NPS I&M protocol guidelines and format requirements as outlined by Oakley et al. (2003).
8. With guidance from the MOJN Data Manager, develop and integrate data management into protocol development and monitoring that meets network and I&M Program standards including, but not limited to, data dictionaries, relational database(s), metadata (documents, images, and spatial and tabular data), spatial data (GPS and layers/shapefiles), and evidence records.
9. Prepare annual & final reports for submission to the MOJN and Rocky Mountain CESU coordinator.
10. Provide MOJN with copies of all project-related data, which must be collected in compliance with the network's Standard Operating Procedures related to project deliverables (i.e. spatial and tabular datasets, images/imagery, field sheets, maps, notes, vouchers).
11. Provide training to MOJN or park staff, if necessary, on technical aspects of sampling methods for implementing the protocol.
12. Cooperate with the Agreement Technical Representative (ATR) to ensure that the conduct of the project complies with the NPS Interim Guidance Document Governing Code of Conduct, Peer Review, and Information Quality Correction for National Park Service Cultural and Natural Resources Disciplines, and with any and all subsequent guidance issued by the NPS Director to replace this interim document.
13. Fully acknowledge the NPS in any published or formally presented material developed or derived from this Task Agreement.
14. Collaborate with the NPS, as appropriate, in a sixty-day wrap-up period following the due date of the last project product.

NATIONAL PARK SERVICE INVOLVEMENT

1. Provide financial assistance to the University of Montana as provided in Article V. The Budget, included as Attachment I, is incorporated in this Task Agreement.
2. Collaborate with the University of Montana in developing, reviewing and modifying work plans, protocols, data, manuscripts and reports. The MOJN Invasive plant working group consists of the cooperator, a network employee, and points of contact at each park.
3. Inform the PI of the specific activities required to comply with the NPS Interim Guidance Document Governing Code of Conduct, Peer Review, and Information Quality Correction for National Park Service Cultural and Natural Resource Disciplines, and any and all subsequent guidance issued by the NPS Director to replace this interim document.
4. Provide workspace and computers for University of Montana researchers at MOJN offices. Obtain background check as required by computer use policies.
5. Provide limited statistical support.
6. Collaborate with University of Montana staff on acquiring information needed by the PI (e.g. spatial data and pilot sampling data).
7. Provide equipment and logistics support for testing and implementing the protocol.
8. Provide required permits and ensure completion of National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) and/or the National Historic Preservation Act (NHPA) compliance is met prior to any field-based testing of monitoring protocols.
9. Where possible, facilitate and participate in project field site visits for any field testing of developed protocols.
10. Where possible, provide no cost camping in park campgrounds, or accommodation at Park dormitories when dorm rooms are available, for any park visits or field testing of protocols.
11. Provide timely review and approval of products.
12. Submit the draft protocol (for peer-review) and final protocol to the Pacific West Regional Inventory and Monitoring (PWR I&M) Program Manager.
13. Fully acknowledge the University of Montana in any published or formally presented material developed or derived from this Task Agreement.
14. Collaborate with the University of Montana, as appropriate, in a sixty-day wrap-up period following the due date of the last project product.

SINGLE-SOURCE JUSTIFICATION

DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR
SINGLE SOURCE POLICY REQUIREMENTS
Department of the Interior Policy (505 DM 2) requires a written justification which explains why competition is not practicable for each single-source award. The justification must address one or more of the following criteria as well as discussion of the program legislative history, unique capabilities of the proposed recipient, and cost-sharing contribution offered by the proposed recipient, as applicable.
In order for an assistance award to be made without competition, the award must satisfy one or more of the following criteria:

(1) Unsolicited Proposal The proposed award is the result of an unsolicited assistance application which represents a unique or innovative idea, method, or approach which is not the subject of a current or planned contract or assistance award, but which is deemed advantageous to the program objectives;
(2) Continuation The activity to be funded is necessary to the satisfactory completion of, or is a continuation of an activity presently being funded, and for which competition would have a significant adverse effect on the continuity or completion of the activity;
(3) Legislative intent The language in the applicable authorizing legislation or legislative history clearly indicates Congress intent to restrict the award to a particular recipient of purpose;
(4) Unique Qualifications The applicant is uniquely qualified to perform the activity based upon a variety of demonstrable factors such as location, property ownership, voluntary support capacity, cost-sharing ability if applicable, technical expertise, or other such unique qualifications;
(5) Emergencies Program/award where there is insufficient time available (due to a compelling and unusual urgency, or substantial danger to health or safety) for adequate competitive procedures to be followed.

NPS did not solicit full and open competition for this award based the following criteria:
(2) Continuation

This is a Task Agreement (P15AC01409) under Cooperative Agreement (P14AC00728) in the amount of $35,000.00 with a period of performance from date of award until 08/31/2017.

"This proposed project between University of Montana and the NPS is authorized to go through the Rocky Mountains CESU at the negotiated overhead rate of 17.5% because it passes the test of substantial involvement by the NPS, public purpose and consistency with the mission of the CESU Network".
Federal Grant Title: Development of an early detection of invasive plants monitoring protocol for the Mojave Desert Network Inventory and Monitoring Program
Federal Agency Name: National Park Service
Grant Categories: Education Employment Labor and Training Environment Natural Resources Regional Development Science and Technology
Type of Opportunity: Discretionary
Funding Opportunity Number: P15AS00263
Type of Funding: Cooperative Agreement
CFDA Numbers: 15.945
CFDA Descriptions: Cooperative Research and Training Programs - Resources of the National Park System
Current Application Deadline: Aug 13, 2015
Original Application Deadline: Aug 13, 2015
Posted Date: Aug 3, 2015
Creation Date: Aug 3, 2015
Archive Date: Aug 14, 2015
Total Program Funding: $137,994
Maximum Federal Grant Award: $137,994
Minimum Federal Grant Award: $1
Expected Number of Awards: 1
Cost Sharing or Matching: No
Applicants Eligible for this Grant
Public and State controlled institutions of higher education
Grant Announcement Contact
June Zastrow, 303-987-6718 June_Zastrow@nps.gov
June_Zastrow@nps.gov

National Park Service 303-898-9819
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